Emerging Scholar Awards

Each year a small number of Emerging Scholar Awards are given to outstanding early-career scholars or graduate students. The Award offers complimentary registration, Network Membership, and CGScholar Credit. It provides a robust professional development opportunity for early career academics to meet experts in the field, interact with colleagues from other parts of the world, and create networks and lasting connections. In our Blended Model, we have two kinds of Emerging Scholars -- In-Person Blended and Online Only. Across all formats, Emerging Scholars play a critical role in the conference by leading discussions and chairing parallel sessions and are offered a publication pathway for their research. This way, we can provide maximum exposure for this selected group of researchers.
To apply, follow the link below. You may also view further instructions by selecting our "Step-By-Step Guide."

Final Deadline: 23 February 2022

2022 Recipients

For each conference, a small number of Emerging Scholar Awards are given to outstanding graduate students and emerging scholars who have an active research interest in the conference themes. Emerging Scholars perform a critical role in the conference by chairing the parallel sessions, providing technical assistance in the sessions, and presenting their own research papers. The 2022 Emerging Scholar Award Recipients are as follows:

Simbarashe Munamati

Simbarashe Munamati

University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe

Simbarashe Munamati is an educationist called by the Lord to ministry in the Reformed Church in Zimbabwe (RCZ). Currently, he is a Doctor of Philosophy candidate with the University of Zimbabwe in the field of Religion and Development. Being an ordained Minister of Religion of the Reformed Church in Zimbabwe, Rev S. Munamati is the sitting Principal of Murray Theological Seminary, where he has lectured Ecclesiology subjects since 2015.He is a budding scholar who has attended and presented papers at various international conferences with publications in areas of Theological education, Ecclesiology, Gender, religion and Development.

​David Krantz

​David Krantz

Arizona State University, United States

David Krantz is a U.S. National Science Foundation IGERT-SUN fellow and a doctoral candidate at the School of Sustainability at Arizona State University, where he studies the intersection of environmental issues and culture, often through the lens of religion. He has published on environmental media, faith-based environmentalism and environmental activism. He is also a member of the board of directors of Interfaith Moral Action on Climate; a cofounder of Interfaith Oceans; and the president and cofounder of Aytzim: Ecological Judaism, an all-volunteer Jewish-environmental nonprofit.

 Reuel Rito Seño

Reuel Rito Seño

De La Salle-College, Philippines

Reuel Rito Seño is a Full-Time faculty of the Theology and Philosophy Area of the School Multidisciplinary Studies of De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde, Manila, Philippines where he teaches both Theology and Philosophy courses to undergraduate students. He is taking up his Doctorate in Philosophy at the University of the Philippines, Diliman. His research interests are in the areas of Theology, Philosophy, Religious Education and Online Learning Pedagogies and Strategies. He is the President of the Religious Educators Association of the Philippines, a professional organization of theology professors, religious educators, catechists, formators and Church workers.

Diana Fenton

Diana Fenton

Associate Professor, St. John’s University & College of St. Benedict, USA

Diana Fenton is an Associate Professor in the Education Department at St. John’s University and the College of St. Benedict in Minnesota, USA. She teaches science to preservice teachers and other introductory courses. She started her career in science research and teaching science in the K-12 classroom. Most of her research has been in K-12 technology integration in schools, however recently she has started researching the impact of the monastic community on women in science.

In Their Words

Being an Emerging Scholar allowed me to participate in both the front end and behind the scenes workings of the conference, which gave me a balanced perspective on what goes into putting on such an event."

Margret Ann Thors, 2017 Awardee

I think this conference really gave me a sense of what interfaith dialogue actually looks like when it is natural. It gave me the chance to refine my own skills in learning and teaching amongst very diverse people."

Trevor B. Williams, 2015 Awardee